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December 28, 2010
News Release
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- The state of Tennessee is in the nation's top 20 when it comes to disaster declarations, and the majority of those disasters have involved flooding. Tennessee ranks number 14 in the country for the most federally declared disasters since 1953 when the record-keeping began. FEMA records show 82 percent of Tennessee's registered disasters involved flooding. In the 1990's alone there were 10 flood-related disaster declarations in Tennessee.
December 20, 2010
News Release
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- This time of year, many are reflecting on the devastation created by the rising floodwaters of May. While most disaster survivors are eager to put 2010 behind them, FEMA is encouraging all Tennesseans to “Resolve to be Ready” for when another disaster strikes. “While no one wants to re-live what happened in Tennessee due to the flooding, this time of reflection serves as a powerful reminder,” said Federal Coordinating Officer Gracia Szczech. “It's everyone's personal responsibility to be ready for a future flood or other disaster.”
November 9, 2010
News Release
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- Six months after a series of deadly spring storms battered Tennessee, the Tennessee Emergency Management Agency (TEMA) and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) continue to partner to lead the recovery programs in support of the affected communities and disaster survivors.
November 3, 2010
News Release
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- While Tennessee winters are generally mild, severe storms are possible. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and the Tennessee Emergency Management Agency (TEMA), encourage Tennesseans to prepare an emergency storm kit, make a disaster plan, and stay informed about approaching winter weather.
October 5, 2010
News Release
LEBANON, Tenn. -- More than 200 disaster recovery case managers representing 17 Tennessee counties have been trained to provide long-term recovery assistance to their neighbors following the severe storms and flooding that battered the state beginning April 30. Additional training opportunities are planned for later this month.
September 30, 2010
News Release
MCMINNVILLE, Tenn. -- Cumberland Caverns continues to ring to the sound of bluegrass music, thanks in part to a disaster loan from the Small Business Administration (SBA). Applications to SBA’s Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) Program are being accepted for the storms and flooding in Tennessee on April 30, and on Aug. 17, 2010.
September 27, 2010
News Release
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- Sometimes, things happen that a family doesn’t expect. That’s why it’s important for Mom and Dad to get ready for any emergency. But kids shouldn’t feel left out – they can help, too! The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has a great website, FEMA Ready Kids, that parents and children can use to prepare for disasters and other kinds of surprises. September is National Preparedness Month.
September 23, 2010
News Release
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- Tennessee has an abundance of rivers and streams – from the bubbling mountain brooks of the east, to its interior workhorse rivers, the Tennessee and the Cumberland, to the mighty Mississippi and its meandering tributaries in the west. Navigate every inch of every year-round waterway in the state and you’ll travel almost 54,000 miles – enough to circle the Earth more than twice.
September 14, 2010
News Release
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- One-fourth of all businesses that close because of a disaster never reopen, according to the Institute for Business and Home Safety. However, businesses that have and implement a disaster preparedness plan typically have less damage, loss and downtime than those that do not. "A business that survives a disaster helps the whole community recover from a disaster," said Federal Coordinating Officer Gracia Szczech.
September 13, 2010
News Release
FRANKLIN, Tenn. - John Heithcock will soon have his family all back under one roof again, thanks to a unique partnership between the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the Tennessee Emergency Management Agency (TEMA) and a local disaster recovery committee. Heithcock and his children lived with family and friends after May floods damaged their Franklin home. The Harpeth River came up so fast that Heithcock and his children had to wade through chest-deep water to safety.

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