Texas Hurricane Ike (DR-1791)

Incident period: September 7, 2008 to October 2, 2008
Major Disaster Declaration declared on September 13, 2008

Updates and Articles, Blogs, and News Releases

June 10, 2009
News Release
TEXAS CITY, Texas -- The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has awarded a $2.7 million grant to Chambers County for work to remove hazardous waste during Hurricane Ike cleanup operations. FEMA awarded $2,735,052 as a payment to contractors who removed the hazardous waste from the Chambers County Debris Fields through March 22. Because the work was carried out before the April 26 deadline for 100 percent federal reimbursement for debris removal, FEMA is paying the total cost of these operations.
June 10, 2009
News Release
TEXAS CITY, Texas -- A new $1 million grant from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) will contribute to repairs and mitigation measures at the city of Galveston's primary pump station, which was flooded in Hurricane Ike's storm surge, FEMA officials said Wednesday.
June 9, 2009
News Release
TEXAS CITY, Texas -- The Hurricane Ike recovery effort reached a major milestone Tuesday when Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) grants awarded to help the state of Texas and local communities recover from the storm topped $1 billion. Allocated under FEMA's Public Assistance Grant Program, the funds provide supplemental financial assistance to state, local and tribal governments, as well as certain private nonprofit groups, for Ike-related response and recovery activities.
June 4, 2009
News Release
TEXAS CITY, Texas -- If you live in a coastal area that is NOT in a hurricane evacuation zone, it is important to make plans for surviving without electricity for a week or more, according to state and federal emergency management officials. Most serious storms will knock out electricity and scatter debris across widespread areas. Trees and power lines will be down.
June 3, 2009
News Release
TEXAS CITY, Texas -- Flood dangers do not end when the water begins to recede, according to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) that has been working with the Governor's Division of Emergency Services (GDEM) because of Hurricane Ike. With the state's history of flooding, Texans need to know what to do after a hurricane. 
June 1, 2009
News Release
TEXAS CITY, Texas -- In a potentially dangerous severe-weather or hurricane situation one of the quickest ways to receive the latest information on the threat is through a NOAA Weather Radio All Hazards receiver.

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