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June 3, 2009
News Release
TEXAS CITY, Texas -- Flood dangers do not end when the water begins to recede, according to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) that has been working with the Governor's Division of Emergency Services (GDEM) because of Hurricane Ike. With the state's history of flooding, Texans need to know what to do after a hurricane. 
June 1, 2009
News Release
TEXAS CITY, Texas -- In a potentially dangerous severe-weather or hurricane situation one of the quickest ways to receive the latest information on the threat is through a NOAA Weather Radio All Hazards receiver.
May 29, 2009
News Release
TEXAS CITY, Texas -- With most of the debris removed from public roads and highways in areas affected by Hurricane Ike, the push now is to complete cleanup operations in bays and lakes along Texas' upper Gulf Coast, officials from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the Governor's Division of Emergency Management (GDEM) said Friday.
May 29, 2009
News Release
TEXAS CITY, Texas -- History can be a great teacher. Texans can prepare for future hurricanes with attention to a personal evacuation route and communication plan. "Learn hurricane-warning signs and your community's alert signals," said Brad Harris, the Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA) federal coordinating officer for Hurricane Ike. Check with your county to find out if you live in an evacuation zone and monitor broadcast media to listen to instructions from local officials on whether to evacuate.
May 29, 2009
News Release
TEXAS CITY, Texas -- Hurricanes are extremely dangerous and unpredictable. They can strengthen tremendously in a matter of hours, taking coastal residents and experts by surprise. There is no guarantee they will follow the path predicted by computer models, according to state and federal emergency management officials.
May 29, 2009
News Release
TEXAS CITY, Texas -- When you are getting ready to return after a hurricane evacuation, make some plans before you travel. There are many challenges to staying safe while making repairs and cleaning up debris after a storm, according to state and federal emergency management officials. Put together a cleanup kit before you go back home. Your kit should include: rubber gloves, cleaning products, bleach, sponges, goggles, spatula, cleanup suits, rubber boots, odor-control products, trash bags, hydrogen peroxide, adhesive bandages, antibiotic ointments and work towels.
May 28, 2009
News Release
TEXAS CITY, Texas -- Hurricanes are the greatest weather threat to Texas, according to state and federal emergency management officials. Hurricane categories are based on the level of damage from hurricane winds. Here is how these dangerous storms form. Air over the ocean warms, picks up moisture and begins a circular motion. This forms a tropical depression, an area of low pressure that draws more air in from other areas.
May 28, 2009
News Release
TEXAS CITY, Texas -- Gulf Coast residents with special health care needs - including people who are disabled or medically fragile – should PLAN IN ADVANCE for storm season according to state and federal emergency management officials.  If you have special needs, live in an evacuation zone and do not have friends or family to help you leave, register IN ADVANCE for assisted transportation by dialing 2-1-1.
May 27, 2009
News Release
TEXAS CITY, Texas -- The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has awarded more than $1 million to Jefferson County Drainage District No. 6 to repair cranes damaged in Hurricane Ike's storm surge. FEMA awarded a $1,124,507 grant to pay for repairs to two Model 4600 S-1 cranes that were damaged as a result of being submerged in saltwater for several days following the storm. Because the requested reimbursement is for repair work, FEMA is paying 75 percent of the total cost.
May 27, 2009
News Release
TEXAS CITY, Texas -- The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has awarded more than $2 million to Texas City for the removal and disposal of debris as part of the Hurricane Ike recovery effort. "FEMA supports efforts by cities and towns throughout the disaster area to get debris cleaned up after the storm," said Federal Coordinating Officer Brad Harris. "This grant covers the cost to clean up more than 210,000 cubic yards of debris in Texas City."

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