Alaska Fire (DR-1666)

Incident period: August 3, 2006 to August 4, 2006
Major Disaster Declaration declared on October 27, 2006

Updates and Articles, Blogs, and News Releases

December 14, 2006
News Release
ANCHORAGE, Alaska -- Alaska has had four major flooding events in two years. Flooding is by far the most common type of natural disaster. It is not just high risk areas that flood. “Between 20 and 25 percent of flood insurance claims come from medium or low flood risk areas,” said Mitigation Officer Terry Scanland, of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). “There is a nine percent chance of fire-related losses in the life of a 30-year mortgage, but a 26 percent chance of flood-related losses.”
December 1, 2006
News Release
ANCHORAGE, Alaska -- Flooding is common throughout Alaska, whether from flowing waters of rivers, streams and coastal storms or, as happened during Thanksgiving along the Bodenburg Creek in Butte, from deep ice buildup forcing water to overflow the bank.
November 22, 2006
News Release
ANCHORAGE, Alaska -- During the first few hours or days following a disaster, individuals and families should be ready to act on behalf of their own safety. Local essential services, such as police, firefighters, medical teams and utility crews may be overwhelmed, and not immediately available. While the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) may be called in to help following an emergency, it is not the primary responding agency for immediate disaster response.
November 13, 2006
News Release
ANCHORAGE, Alaska -- When disaster strikes, businesses are affected too: buildings can be damaged, inventory ruined, and records lost. Yet, orders still must be filled and payrolls must be met. Owners, caught up in building the business, meeting with customers and handling employee issues, often fail to prepare for the worst. According to disaster recovery officials, preparing for a disaster, and limiting the damage a business in the area most likely would suffer, is something every business owner can do.
November 8, 2006
News Release
ANCHORAGE, Alaska -- Knowledge is power, and knowing what you are going to do when a disaster disrupts your life gives you the power to act, not react, during a time of chaos and confusion. Disaster recovery officials with the Alaska Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management (DHS&EM) and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) have some disaster preparedness tips to help families and individuals, including those with special needs, plan their initial actions during devastating emergencies. Have a communication plan.
November 2, 2006
News Release
ANCHORAGE, Alaska -- Alaskans know about flooding. Floods are the most frequent and costly disaster to occur here in the state. Fall can bring sea storms and driving tides. In early winter, excessive rainfall can lead to run-off over frozen ground. With spring, the winter’s ice and snow melts, pushing rivers beyond their banks. The Alaska Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management (DHS&EM) and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) have tips to help households protect important records, valuables, and heirlooms that may get caught in a flood.

Pages

Main Content

State/Tribal Government: