Tennessee Severe Storms and Tornadoes (DR-1634)

Incident period: April 2, 2006 to April 8, 2006
Major Disaster Declaration declared on April 5, 2006

Updates and Articles, Blogs, and News Releases

April 24, 2006
News Release
JACKSON, Tenn. -- Keeping contact information current is as important as registration in the disaster recovery process. That is the message federal and state officials here are stressing to Tennesseans affected by the recent tornadoes. Residents need to stay in touch with the Federal Emergency Management Agency and update their contact information as it changes. “Unfortunately, if we can’t find you, we can’t provide the assistance you need,” said Mike Karl, FEMA’s coordinating officer for disaster operations here.
April 21, 2006
News Release
JACKSON, Tenn. - While travel trailers may serve as temporary housing in some disasters, the hardest hit communities in Tennessee apparently have enough rental properties available to meet the needs of those displaced by the recent tornadoes and severe storms, according to state and federal officials. "Travel trailers are never our first choice for temporary housing," said Louis Friedmann, the state deputy coordinating officer for this disaster. ?For most families, apartments or rented houses are preferable to living in a travel trailer for months at a time."
April 21, 2006
News Release
JACKSON, Tenn. -- Mobile Disaster Recovery Centers (DRCs) are relocating throughout disaster-declared areas in Tennessee to help victims with disaster assistance questions, according to state and Federal Emergency Management Agency officials.
April 21, 2006
News Release
JACKSON, Tenn. -- Residents of 15 Tennessee counties now are eli gible to claim income tax refunds from the Internal Revenue Service if they suffered uninsured property losses in the recent tornadoes and severe storms. They can get the additional refund quickly by filing amended tax returns for 2004.
April 20, 2006
News Release
JACKSON, Tenn. -- State and federal disaster officials urge Tennesseans to make safety their first priority when returning to storm-damaged homes or businesses. “The dangers are not over just because the tornadoes have ended,” said Michael Karl, the official in charge of recovery operations here for the Federal Emergency Management Agency. “Many hazards such as unstable structures still exist, and we urge people to be very careful.” Although piles of debris may contain valuables or precious memories, they also may be life-threatening for those working near them.
April 20, 2006
News Release
JACKSON, Tenn. -- Every disaster has its share of scam artists trying to take advantage of people, but state and federal officials don’t want you to become a victim twice. It may seem natural to trust everyone who offers help or seeks information at your door, but be wise. A little suspicion now may protect your money or your safety later.

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