Kentucky Severe Storms, Tornadoes, Flooding, and Mudslides (DR-1523)

Incident period: May 26, 2004 to June 18, 2004
Major Disaster Declaration declared on June 10, 2004

Updates and Articles, Blogs, and News Releases

June 30, 2004
News Release
FRANKFORT, Ky. -- Rebuilding your life, your home, and taking care of your family is difficult after a disaster that has turned your life upside down. There are financial and emotional challenges. It takes strength to know when you need support or guidance to help you through the stress of recovery. Crisis counselors are available to help.
June 29, 2004
News Release
FRANKFORT, Ky. -- Post-tornado pictures often show the same stark image: a central room or stairwell of a severely damaged house still standing when little else remains. Using this lesson, recovery officials urge Kentucky residents to consider building a reinforced "safe room" in their existing homes to help protect their families from injury or death caused by the dangerous forces of extreme winds.
June 28, 2004
News Release
FRANKFORT, Ky. -- The unrelenting onslaught of severe rains that saturated large areas of Kentucky eroded dozens of hillsides, sending powerful and destructive muddy masses into numerous neighborhoods, backyards and homes. Mudflows, mudslides and landslides usually strike without warning. The force of rocks, soil, or other debris moving down a slope can devastate anything in its path. In the United States, it is estimated that they cause up to $2 billion in damages and from 25 to 50 deaths annually.
June 28, 2004
News Release
FRANKFORT, Ky. -- The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the Commonwealth of Kentucky currently have four Disaster Recovery Centers (DRCs) open to serve residents of disaster-stricken counties. At the centers, homeowners, renters, and businesses will have the opportunity to discuss their recovery-related concerns one-on-one with disaster officials.
June 26, 2004
News Release
FRANKFORT, Ky. - Recovery officials said that some common misunderstandings about disaster assistance may deprive eligible individuals and households of vital aid from the state and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). "The last thing you need in a disaster is misinformation," said Deputy Federal Coordinating Officer Pat Seaman. "And the best way to avoid that problem is to call and ask what kind of assistance is available to you."
June 24, 2004
News Release
FRANKFORT, Ky. -- Kentuckians who have registered for federal and state disaster assistance can expect to have their damaged property inspected to verify losses, according to Michael Bolch, head of recovery operations for the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). “The inspectors review the amount of damage and use wireless uplinks to get that information to housing specialists immediately,” said Bolch. “Keeping appointments and showing inspectors the extent of your damages is critical to getting aid quickly.”

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