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July 30, 2004
News Release
FRANKFORT, Ky. -- With just a week remaining for registration, more than $38 million in grants and low-interest disaster loans has been approved to assist Kentucky residents who suffered damages from the severe storms, tornadoes and flooding that occurred May 26 through June 18.
July 29, 2004
News Release
FRANKFORT, Ky. -- Even after the registration period closes for Kentucky disaster victims on August 9, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) will continue to process applications received before the deadline. Just remember, it doesn't cost anything to have your application processed and if someone calls offering to expedite your application for a fee, they're just trying to rip you off!
July 28, 2004
News Release
FRANKFORT, Ky. -- Disaster victims in Kentucky have only two weeks to register with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for state and federal assistance for damage suffered during May’s tornadoes, flooding and severe storms. While registrations cannot be accepted after the August 9 deadline, FEMA will continue to process all applications received before the deadline.
July 22, 2004
News Release
FRANKFORT, Ky. -- Six weeks since a presidential disaster declaration was signed for Kentucky on June 10, more than $34 million in grants and low-interest disaster loans has been approved to assist residents who suffered damages from severe storms and floods, according to disaster recovery officials from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and Kentucky Emergency Management (KyEM). Federal, state, local and voluntary agencies are working in partnership to help Kentuckians throughout the disaster recovery process. The following is an update of their activities:
July 21, 2004
News Release
FRANKFORT, Ky. -- Kentucky disaster recovery officials estimate that the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) will reimburse state and local governments and certain eligible non-profit agencies more than $16 million for disaster-related outlays caused by the severe storms that raked the state between May 16 and June 18.
July 20, 2004
News Release
FRANKFORT, Ky. -- As you stroll the aisles of a local store, a sign might catch your eye proclaiming, “The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) recommends you buy or use the following.” Don’t believe it! “FEMA doesn’t endorse any specific products or services,” said Michael Bolch, the federal coordinating officer overseeing statewide recovery efforts for the agency. “If you see something suggesting an endorsement, please notify us right away.”
July 15, 2004
News Release
FRANKFORT, Ky. -- Disaster aid for 78 Kentucky counties impacted by severe storms and flooding between May 26 and June 18 now exceeds $30 million. More than 8,600 households and business have applied to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for a wide range of federal and state disaster assistance programs. “We’re continuing to provide help throughout the designated areas,” said Michael Bolch, the federal official coordinating the response for the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). “We urge you to call soon. Don’t disqualify yourself by not registering.”
July 14, 2004
News Release
FRANKFORT, Ky. -- Kentuckians who had flood insurance on buildings damaged by recent flooding may be eligible for up to $30,000 in aid they often do not even know about. That money can be used to make their home or business safe against future floods.
July 13, 2004
News Release
FRANKFORT, Ky. -- Disaster Recovery Centers will be closing in Eastern Kentucky this week, but answers to disaster questions and updates about your application are just a phone call away, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) officials point out.
July 12, 2004
News Release
FRANKFORT, Ky. -- Thousands of people who experienced flood losses in recent years had no flood insurance because they never thought they would need it. With the National Flood Insurance Program's (NFIP) low-cost Preferred Risk Policy, they don't have to take that risk.

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