Ohio Severe Storms, Flooding, Mudslides, and Landslides (DR-1507)

Incident period: January 3, 2004 to January 30, 2004
Major Disaster Declaration declared on January 26, 2004

Updates and Articles, Blogs, and News Releases

February 9, 2004
News Release
COLUMBUS, Ohio -- In the days and first few weeks following a disaster, residents may be misled by half-truths and rumors they hear about how to get help and the various assistance programs that are available. When you have suffered a loss, the last thing you need is misinformation. According to state and federal disaster recovery officials, the best way to avoid that problem is to call and find out for yourself just what kind of assistance is available.
February 9, 2004
News Release
COLUMBUS, Ohio -- It may be snowing outside now, but if your home was flooded it could be harboring mold. Disaster recovery and health officials warn that victims of January flooding should clean flood-damaged homes thoroughly now to avoid possible health problems from mold and mildew in the warmer months ahead. "Mold is a significant problem after flooding and proper cleanup is critical to ensure it doesn't affect your or your family's health," Ohio Department of Health (ODH) Director J. Nick Baird, M.D. said.
February 6, 2004
News Release
COLUMBUS, Ohio -- A total of $571,198 in grants and low-interest loans have already been approved for Ohio disaster victims in seven designated counties that became eligible to call and apply for assistance just over a week ago, according to federal and state disaster recovery officials.
February 5, 2004
News Release
COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Only a few more days remain to take advantage of the free technical advice on how to reduce damages from future disasters available at the FEMA/State Disaster Recovery Centers located in Marietta and Dillonvale.
February 3, 2004
News Release
Note to Editors: Federal and state agencies are working in partnership to help Ohio residents following the recent severe storms, flooding, landslides and mudslides. People dealing with the uncertainties and stresses disasters present often become disoriented and confused. They need simple, easy to understand information, which answers their most basic questions. The following is intended to provide additional information about the disaster recovery process and long-term recovery programs.
February 2, 2004
News Release
COLUMBUS, Ohio -- If you were affected by January's severe storms, flooding, landslides or mudslides you should be aware that some unscrupulous contractors might try to take advantage of you. "If you have disaster-related damages, I urge you to be very careful when contracting for repairs," Ron Sherman, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) coordinating officer said. "I do not want you to become a victim a second time."

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