District of Columbia (DC) Hurricane Isabel (DR-1493)

Incident period: September 18, 2003 to September 29, 2003
Major Disaster Declaration declared on September 20, 2003

Updates and Articles, Blogs, and News Releases

October 20, 2003
News Release
Washington, DC -- Hundreds of trees took a pounding when Hurricane Isabel's fierce winds and heavy rain descended on the District of Columbia last month. Fallen and uprooted trees impeded power restoration to thousands of residents, blocked access to throughways, and created tons of debris that had to be removed and disposed. "Damage to trees during Hurricane Isabel was twice as bad as any storm in the recent past," said Tom Henderson, Department of Public Works (DPW) Administrator of Solid Waste.
October 16, 2003
News Release
Washington, DC - District and federal disaster assistance applications and follow-up calls by victims of Hurricane Isabel can now be made on weekdays only. Weekend service has been discontinued due to greatly diminished need over past weekends. A total of 1,392 applications have been made in D.C. to date.
October 15, 2003
News Release
Washington, DC - The D.C. Emergency Management Agency (EMA) and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), along with various federal and district partners and voluntary agencies, continue to help residents of the District of Columbia who were affected by Hurricane Isabel. As of Oct. 14, agencies have approved $5.82 million in federal disaster assistance to help residents meet their basic disaster-recovery needs. Recovery Assistance for Individuals and Households
October 13, 2003
News Release
WASHINGTON -- District of Columbia residents who have insurance may still apply for disaster assistance for damages and losses resulting from Hurricane Isabel announced officials from the D.C. Emergency Management Agency and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Federal disaster assistance helps with uninsured or under-insured losses caused by a disaster. Before making a decision, however, FEMA simply needs to know how much insurance is available to an applicant for disaster assistance before determining eligibility.
October 13, 2003
News Release
WASHINGTON -- According to The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), mold growth in water-damaged homes is a potential hazard from flooding. Disaster recovery officials from the District of Columbia Emergency Management Agency and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) recommend that victims of Hurricane Isabel look out for mold.
October 13, 2003
News Release
WASHINGTON -- Hurricane Isabel victims in the District who have questions about disaster assistance should call the Helpline. The D.C. Emergency Management Agency (DCEMA) and officials from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) maintain these telephone services to help disaster victims keep in touch. All calls are toll-free.

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Photo of Scott Wells, Larry Zensinger, and Ted Monette. Scott Wells, FEMA's federal coordinating officer, briefs Larry Zensinger and Ted Monette, from the Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency Headquarters in D.C, on the Individuals and Household Program statistics for the District of Columbia. The President declared the District as a disaster area on September 21 after Hurricane Isabel passed through the city. Nearly 1,500 District residents have registered for FEMA disaster assistance and the agency has funded more than $600,000 in aid.


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