District of Columbia (DC) Hurricane Isabel (DR-1493)

Incident period: September 18, 2003 to September 29, 2003
Major Disaster Declaration declared on September 20, 2003

Updates and Articles, Blogs, and News Releases

November 12, 2003
News Release
Philadelphia, PA -- Residents and business owners who suffered losses or damages in Washington, D.C., as a result of Hurricane Isabel have a week left to apply for disaster assistance. Nov. 19 is the deadline under President Bush's disaster declaration for those affected by the hurricane in September. Those who still need to apply for assistance may register by calling 1-800-621-FEMA (3362). There is a TTY number - 1-800-462-7585 - for applicants who are speech or hearing impaired.
October 20, 2003
News Release
Washington, DC -- District of Columbia staff and volunteers managed the ice distribution process at Backus Junior High School so efficiently that residents had the option of walking up or driving through to get ice after Hurricane Isabel hurled through the city.
October 20, 2003
News Release
Washington, DC -- They are at every disaster, usually on the front line helping to meet the immediate and urgent needs of disaster victims. Some bring specialized skills and expertise; others offer an extra pair of hands or needed manpower. While their tasks may be different, they all share a desire to help and make a difference. They are volunteers.
October 20, 2003
News Release
Washington, DC - Those who suffered losses or damages in the District of Columbia as a result of Hurricane Isabel and who live or have a business in the areas declared disaster areas by President Bush under the Sept. 20 disaster declaration, have one month left to apply for disaster assistance. The deadline for individuals and businesses to register for assistance is Nov. 19.
October 20, 2003
News Release
Washington, DC -- Hundreds of trees took a pounding when Hurricane Isabel's fierce winds and heavy rain descended on the District of Columbia last month. Fallen and uprooted trees impeded power restoration to thousands of residents, blocked access to throughways, and created tons of debris that had to be removed and disposed. "Damage to trees during Hurricane Isabel was twice as bad as any storm in the recent past," said Tom Henderson, Department of Public Works (DPW) Administrator of Solid Waste.
October 20, 2003
News Release
Washington, DC - As victims of Hurricane Isabel turn their energy and resources to cleaning up, repairing and replacing their damaged property, they can become targets for con artists warn the District of Columbia Emergency Management Agency (DCEMA) and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). "If someone takes your money, it may be impossible to get it back," said Barbara Childs-Pair, deputy director for DCEMA. "If you suspect fraud, call and report it to 311, the Metropolitan Police Department non-emergency phone number."

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Photo of Scott Wells, Larry Zensinger, and Ted Monette. Scott Wells, FEMA's federal coordinating officer, briefs Larry Zensinger and Ted Monette, from the Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency Headquarters in D.C, on the Individuals and Household Program statistics for the District of Columbia. The President declared the District as a disaster area on September 21 after Hurricane Isabel passed through the city. Nearly 1,500 District residents have registered for FEMA disaster assistance and the agency has funded more than $600,000 in aid.


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