West Virginia Severe Storms, Flooding and Landslides (DR-1474)

Incident period: June 11, 2003 to July 15, 2003
Major Disaster Declaration declared on June 21, 2003

Updates and Articles, Blogs, and News Releases

July 28, 2003
News Release
Charleston, WV -- Federal and state officials announced the closing this week of three Disaster Recovery Centers (DRCs). The following centers will close at 7 p.m. on the dates announced.
July 28, 2003
News Release
Charleston, WV -- The West Virginia Office of Emergency Services and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) will hold two mitigation events and offer mitigation materials to home supply stores within the diaster-affected counties. Mitigation representatives from FEMA will be on hand to explain mitigation techniques that can lessen damage to homes, businesses and property from any future flooding. Brochures will be available on the National Flood Insurance Program and written materials on mitigation techniques such as retrofitting and elevation.
July 28, 2003
News Release
Charleston, WV - State, federal and local officials and voluntary agencies continue to help West Virginians who were affected by the severe storms, flooding, and landslides that began on June 11, 2003 and continued through July 15, 2003. To date, nearly $12 million in disaster assistance has been approved to help residents meet their most basic disaster-recovery needs. Recovery services summary at close of business Sunday, July 27:
July 25, 2003
News Release
Charleston, WV -- As West Virginians continue with the recovery process, many are vowing to be better prepared in case of future disasters. Even children can take an active role in disaster education and preparedness. The "FEMA for Kids" Web site is a great resource for young and old minds alike.
July 24, 2003
News Release
Charleston, WV -- Like adults, kids are exposed to all kinds of weather information and understanding what's being reported can be vital. Today's kids are becoming disaster-weather savvy and safe by using the many resources available to them. As they watch television at home, kids can become acquainted with disaster weather terms like flooding, flash floods. Educators, parents and guardians can explain the weather terms in a child-friendly way; and, in turn, the children may even teach their friends what dangerous weather is and how to react to it.
July 23, 2003
News Release
Charleston, WV -- West Virginians with insurance who have also applied for disaster assistance to help recover from the recent storms, flooding and landslides, may need to supply additional information about their insurance claim before their FEMA application can be processed.

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