Oklahoma Severe Storms and Tornadoes (DR-1465)

Incident period: May 8, 2003 to May 30, 2003
Major Disaster Declaration declared on May 10, 2003

Updates and Articles, Blogs, and News Releases

May 16, 2003
News Release
Oklahoma City, OK -- In early May, the United States experienced more than 400 tornadoes within a one-week period. The people of Oklahoma saw the devastation first-hand and many survived the deadly storms because they were prepared. The message is clear-storm and tornado preparation pays off. No one is defenseless in the face of these deadly storms as long as preparedness remains a priority. Tornadoes approach quickly, and there is only a short amount of time to make life-or-death decisions. Advance planning and quick response are the keys to surviving a tornado.
May 16, 2003
News Release
Oklahoma City, OK -- Federal and state officials advise those who have received disaster assistance funds to use them carefully. "It is our responsibility to help people in need and, at the same time, to make sure that the taxpayers' money is spent correctly," said Federal Coordinating Officer Justin DeMello. "Disaster funds are designed to cover basic disaster needs and give people a starting place to begin rebuilding their lives." Housing Assistance funds are intended for:
May 16, 2003
News Release
Oklahoma City, OK -- Local government officials can learn about federal and state disaster recovery assistance by attending a Public Assistance briefing on Monday. Cleveland, Oklahoma, Lincoln and Osage counties are eligible for Public Assistance. This briefing is for local governments only.
May 16, 2003
News Release
Oklahoma City, OK -- In less than a week since the disaster declaration, federal and state officials announce that more than $800,000 has been approved to assist those affected by the severe storms and tornadoes that began on May 8. Current disaster information is as follows:
May 15, 2003
News Release
Oklahoma City, OK -- As Oklahomans recover from the severe storms and tornadoes that began on May 8, many will seek contractors to repair or rebuild their homes. Most contractors are reputable individuals. Some, however, may try to take advantage of disaster victims during the reconstruction phase. Don't be a victim twice. Look first to licensed local contractors who have performed well in the past. If they cannot help you, ask them to recommend reputable contractors.
May 14, 2003
News Release
Oklahoma City, OK -- The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ) advise those who have disaster-damaged household chemicals to dispose of them safely. Damaged household chemicals, not handled properly, may be a threat to your safety. Chemicals such as paints, varnishes, kitchen cleaners, fertilizers, pesticides and any flammable liquids need to be disposed of by using one of the several collection locations set up around the Oklahoma City area.

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