Tennessee Severe Storms, Tornadoes and Flooding (DR-1464)

Incident period: May 4, 2003 to May 30, 2003
Major Disaster Declaration declared on May 8, 2003

Updates and Articles, Blogs, and News Releases

May 24, 2003
News Release
Nashville, TN -- There's more to moving back into a flooded home than replacing the carpeting, disaster officials say, including a need for serious attention to health and safety risks. Enter your flooded home cautiously, watching for hazards like collapsed walls, sinking floors, spilled chemicals and the presence of snakes or other animals. Enter only with adequate light so you can see hazards that may be present.
May 24, 2003
News Release
Nashville, TN -- People affected by the recent flooding should be on the look out for mold growth in buildings. Water from recent heavy rains can cause mold to grow on many things. Water-damaged carpets, wallboard, insulation, padding, and upholstery are materials that are subject to mold growth. These items or other porous materials may need to be thrown away if they were saturated with water and mold has begun to grow. If wet or damp materials or areas were dried 24-48 hours after flooding occurred, in most cases mold will not grow.
May 23, 2003
News Release
Nashville, TN -- With more than $10 million in federal and state disaster assistance already approved for families affected by May's successive waves of severe storms, Tennessee counties are beginning the difficult path toward recovery. Three fixed and three mobile FEMA Disaster Recovery Centers (DRCs) are providing disaster recovery information to residents. Here is a rundown of the second week of response and recovery activity:
May 23, 2003
News Release
Nashville, TN -- The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) expanded the Tennessee disaster declaration Friday, making individuals and local governments and certain non-profit agencies in 23 counties eligible for financial and other assistance in recovering from losses caused by May's violent weather.
May 23, 2003
News Release
Nashville, TN -- Disaster assistance information is as near as the telephone for residents of Tennessee's 46 storm-disaster counties who are unable to visit a disaster recovery center to learn about federal and state assistance. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has a toll-free phone number -- 1-800-621 FEMA (3362) -- that can be used to get the same information that is available in the six recovery centers located in various parts of the state.
May 23, 2003
News Release
Nashville, TN -- All state-federal disaster recovery facilities in Tennessee will remain staffed and open through the Memorial Day holiday. These include the disaster recovery centers in Jackson, Murfreesboro and Chattanooga, and mobile facilities in the field. "The folks in Tennessee who suffered losses in the storms won't have a holiday from their problems, so we won't be taking one either," said Michael Bolch of Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the official in charge of federal recovery operations.

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