Arkansas Severe Winter Storm (DR-1354)

Incident period: December 12, 2000 to January 8, 2001
Major Disaster Declaration declared on December 29, 2000

Updates and Articles, Blogs, and News Releases

February 1, 2001
News Release
Little Rock, AR -- Severe December ice storms damaged more than 300,000 acres of forest and timberland. Much of it is privately owned. Any woodland owner with damaged timber should be especially careful when hiring someone to harvest stands or remove debris. No one knows for sure how much timber is stolen from the 192 million forested acres owned by all U.S. taxpayers. Former Forest Service chief Dale Robertson once guessed it could be worth as much as $100 million a year.
February 1, 2001
News Release
Little Rock, AR -- County and city officials and other eligible applicants in 61 counties who are managing recovery efforts due to the December ice storms have until February 9 to file a request for public assistance with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the Arkansas Department of Emergency Management (ADEM). Public assistance funds can be used by cities and counties and other eligible applicants for reimbursement of expenses incurred for:
February 1, 2001
News Release
Little Rock, AR -- Elderly and disabled homeowners still need help cleaning up after the December ice storms. Several service groups have been assisting these individuals, clearing and moving debris from private property to the public right of way. But more help is needed. "We appreciate the efforts of these good neighbors who come forth and pitch in to help their fellow Arkansans," said Joe D. Bray, federal coordinating officer with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). "Their selfless efforts do make a difference."
January 31, 2001
News Release
Little Rock, AR -- Tornadoes, thunderstorms, floods, wildfires, snow and ice storms occur whether we are prepared for them or not. We may not be able to control Mother Nature, but we may be able to mitigate (lessen) the effects of her power. "Disaster can strike at any time. Therefore disaster preparedness is a must for all seasons," said Kathy Reimer, hazard mitigation specialist for the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).
January 31, 2001
News Release
Little Rock, AR -- The first 72 hours after a disaster are critical. Electricity, gas, water and telephones may not be working. In addition, public safety services such as police and fire departments may be busy handling serious crisis. You should be prepared to be self-sufficient- able to live without running water, electricity and/or gas, and telephones-for at least three days following a disaster. To do so, keep on hand in a central location the following:
January 30, 2001
News Release
Little Rock, AR -- While many power outages during the December ice storms were from damage on main electrical lines, some property owners found that the source of their suffering was the trees in their own backyard. To prevent future outages to communities, utility companies will be pruning trees that grow under, above or around electric distribution lines on public rights of way.

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