Kansas Tornadoes and Severe Storms (DR-1273)

Incident period: May 3, 1999 to May 6, 1999
Major Disaster Declaration declared on May 4, 1999

Updates and Articles, Blogs, and News Releases

May 11, 1999
News Release
WASHINGTON, D.C. -- Federal, state and local officials are responding to the disasters in Oklahoma Kansas, and Texas. Only two people are still missing, both in Oklahoma, and no additional storm-related fatalities have been reported. As field staff began to take charge of operations, the FEMA Headquarters Emergency Support Team was deactivated as of Monday afternoon. Oklahoma:For complete FEMA coverage of this disaster
May 11, 1999
News Release
WICHITA, Kan. -- State and federal disaster recovery officials advise Kansans to be extremely careful when hiring contractors to clean and repair disaster damage or remove disaster debris. Some scam artists claim to be "FEMA certified." The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) neither certifies nor endorses any private-sector contractor. Individuals and government entities should be extremely cautious when hiring contractors after any disaster.
May 11, 1999
News Release
WICHITA, Kan. -- State and federal officials have established a joint federal/state Disaster Recovery Center (DRC) in Wichita, Kansas. The DRC is located at: 2561-20 South Seneca St. Wichita, Kansas The DRC will open to assist applicants on Thursday, May 13. The DRC operating hours will be from 8:00 a.m. until 7:00 p.m., daily until further notice.
May 11, 1999
News Release
WICHITA, Kan. -- In response to Governor Bill Graves' request, the counties of Reno and Sumner were added today to President Clinton's disaster declaration of May 4, 1999. Homeowners, renters, farmers, agricultural producers, and business owners in Reno, Sedgwick and Sumner Counties who sustained damage from the severe storms and tornadoes which struck south-central Kansas on May 3, are now eligible for federal assistance.
May 10, 1999
News Release
WASHINGTON, D.C. -- New information on the Federal, state and local response to the Kansas disaster.
May 10, 1999
News Release
WASHINGTON, D.C. -- Residents of tornado-prone areas can get information from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) about how to build a "safe room" in their homes that can provide protection against deadly tornadoes. The 25-page illustrated FEMA publication, Taking Shelter from the Storm: Building a Safe Room Inside Your House , outlines the basics of in-house safe room shelter design, including construction plans, materials and construction cost estimates.

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