Oklahoma Tornadoes, Severe Storms, and Flooding (DR-1272)

Incident period: May 3, 1999 to May 4, 1999
Major Disaster Declaration declared on May 4, 1999

Updates and Articles, Blogs, and News Releases

May 10, 1999
News Release
OKLAHOMA CITY, Okla. -- Local jurisdictions now have through June 3 to contract for debris removal to receive 100 percent federal funding, according to state and federal disaster recovery officials. Typically jurisdictions have 72 hours from a presidentially declared disaster to formalize an emergency services agreement. "Extending the debris removal time allows local jurisdictions a better opportunity to plan their work projects more efficiently and effectively," said Fred Liebe, state coordinating officer of the Oklahoma Department of Civil Emergency Management (ODCEM).
May 10, 1999
News Release
WASHINGTON, D.C. -- Residents of tornado-prone areas can get information from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) about how to build a "safe room" in their homes that can provide protection against deadly tornadoes. The 25-page illustrated FEMA publication, Taking Shelter from the Storm: Building a Safe Room Inside Your House , outlines the basics of in-house safe room shelter design, including construction plans, materials and construction cost estimates.
May 9, 1999
News Release
OKLAHOMA CITY, Okla. -- Only two days after President Bill Clinton issued the disaster declaration. May 4, the first financial assistance checks have been approved for Oklahomans whose homes were damaged or destroyed by the tornadoes, severe storms and flooding that occurred May 3-5.
May 9, 1999
News Release
OKLAHOMA CITY, Okla. -- A massive debris removal operation will get underway this week, federal and state disaster recovery officials announced today. They have the huge task of coordinating the removal of 500,000 cubic yards of debris from the first 11 counties included in the Presidential disaster declaration in the wake of the tornadoes and severe storms of May 3-5.
May 7, 1999
News Release
OKLAHOMA CITY, Okla. -- The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will begin debris removal from affected areas early next week, starting with municipal streets, roads and public property in the 11 counties originally declared eligible for federal disaster assistance as a result of the severe storms and tornadoes of May 3-4. Individuals may also place debris next to the road for pickup, according to Tom Logsdon, the Corps' site manager for the project. "We'll be sending out trucks and crews to clean streets and rights of way up to 15 feet on each side of the street," Logsdon said.
May 7, 1999
News Release
The situation in brief as of 5:00 p.m. Friday, May 7, 1999: President Clinton Thursday issued a major disaster declaration for Bowie County, Texas. The disaster declaration makes available a variety of federal programs to help people and communities recover and rebuild more safely for the future. Additional FEMA resources are moving into all affected areas as disaster field offices are established in Kansas and Oklahoma. Shelter operators report that shelter use is decreasing as temporary housing is identified.

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