Blog

Main Content

Update 3: Supporting Ongoing Wildfire Fight

We continue to support federal, state, local and tribal efforts to combat the raging wildfires in Texas and California. Our thoughts and prayers are with the families and communities being impacted by these wildfires, and we sincerely thank the firefighters and first responders who have been heroically working around the clock to fight these fires.

Last night, the President called Texas Governor Rick Perry to express his concern for citizens of Texas impacted by the unprecedented fires. During the call the President extended his condolences for the lives that have been lost as a result of these events, and made clear that the federal government, through DHS/FEMA and the U.S. Forest Service, will continue to make federal assistance available, as needed, to state and local officials as they fight the fires. The President also assured the Governor that requests for additional assistance, including as recovery begins, would be quickly assessed.

Wildfire damage to a home in Bastrop County, Texas. FEMA is providing assistance to state firefighting efforts through Fire Management Assistance Grants.
Bastrop County, TX, September 7, 2011 -- Wildfire damage to a home in Bastrop County, Texas. FEMA is providing assistance to state firefighting efforts through Fire Management Assistance Grants.

As we said in yesterday’s update, at the request of the Governor, the Administration has granted eight Fire Management Assistance Grants in the last several days, making federal funds available to reimburse eligible costs associated with efforts to combat the fires. (Read yesterday’s post for more on our efforts to support the state of Texas during this year’s busy wildfire season.) According to the U.S. Forest Service, there are currently, more than 2,000 U.S. Forest Service federal firefighters and support personnel assigned to the Texas fires.

We’re also actively working with state and local officials to conduct damage assessments and to identify areas where additional federal assistance may be warranted. At the request of the Governor, FEMA, state and local officials have already completed damage assessments in fire affected areas including Bastrop and Williamson counties; and are continuing with assessments beginning today in Colorado, Leon and Travis counties. These assessments are designed to give the governor of the state a better picture of disaster damages, and to determine if a request for further federal support is needed.

And for those who may be affected by the wildfires in Texas or California, here are some tips to remember:



  • Listen to and follow the guidance of state and local officials. If authorities order an evacuation, leave immediately, follow evacuation routes announced by local officials.
  • Create an area of “defensible space” around your home. Clear items that will burn from around the house, including wood piles, lawn furniture, barbecue grills, tarp coverings, etc.
  • If you’re caught in the open during a wildfire, The best temporary shelter is in a sparse fuel area. Clear fuel away from the area while the fire is approaching and then lie face down in the depression and cover yourself. Stay down until after the fire passes.
  • Let your family and friends know you’re OK, especially if you’re told to evacuate. In case phone lines are congested, try sending a text message, e-mail, or updating your social networking sites. The American Red Cross Safe and Well site offers another way for disaster survivors to update their status and for family and friends to search for loved ones.

For more information on getting prepared for wildfires, visit www.Ready.gov/wildfires.

Update 4: Closely Watching Lee, Katia, Maria, & Nate

The peak of hurricane season is here, and we’re closely watching the effects of tropical storm Lee’s remnants, Hurricane Katia in the Atlantic, and the newly formed tropical storms – Nate and Maria.

As we continue working closely to support the states recovering from the impacts of Irene, we are also working closely with them to support state and local response operations from Lee as a major flood threat continues. Here’s an overview of what we’re doing:

  • We have liaison officers in many Mid-Atlantic state emergency operations centers who are in constant coordination with the National Weather Service, other federal partners and state emergency management agency partners across the Mid-Atlantic states and New England.
  • A FEMA liaison is being deployed to the Broome County Emergency Operations Center in New York, to ensure that the state has the needed resources to respond to the ongoing flood threat in that area.
  • We have commodities (such as cots, blankets, food and water) that were prepositioned in advance of Hurricane Irene that can be sent out if the state requires additional commodities. In New York, 450 cots were on hand and turned over to the state and delivered to the Binghamton University shelter.

As the remnants of Lee move from the Mid-Atlantic into upstate New York and southern New England, additional heavy rainfall is likely in these locations before the entire system slowly dissipates by the end of the week. If you’re in an area that may be impacted, don’t put yourself at risk; follow the instructions of local officials. (More flood safety tips)

Tropical Storm Maria
In the Atlantic, tropical storm Maria is forecast to move further westward. According to the National Hurricane Center, those in the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico should closely monitor the progress of the storm. We are deploying an Incident Management Assistance Team to the U.S. Virgin Islands to assist territory and local authorities in coordination efforts; and we already have a Joint Field Office open in Puerto Rico due to our ongoing recovery efforts from Hurricane Irene.

Nate and Katia
While tropical storm Nate (in the Gulf of Mexico) and Hurricane Katia (in the Atlantic) pose no immediate threat to the U.S. mainland or territories, we continue to closely monitor their progress. History reminds us that tropical storm systems can change paths with little warning, so those in coastal or inland areas should take steps to get prepared. Hurricane season lasts until November 30, so take steps now to make sure your family and property are safe – visit Ready.gov/hurricanes for more information.

And for the latest on all the developing tropical systems, visit Hurricanes.gov or Hurricanes.gov/mobile on your phone.

Update 2: FEMA Support to Texas Wildfires

(Entrada de blog en español / Spanish blog post)

Yesterday, our Region VI Administrator, Tony Russell blogged about the support we are providing the state of Texas, as they work to combat devastating wildfires. At the time of yesterday’s blog post, we had authorized Fire Management Assistance Grants (FMAGs) for seven fires, meaning FEMA funding will be available to pay 75 percent of state and local government eligible firefighting costs.

Since then, we have authorized an additional FMAG for the Bear Creek Fire, bringing the total to 8 for this series of fires and 53 for this year.

With FMAGs in the news again, we thought we’d point you to a post we did at the end of April that explains FEMA’s role when it comes to financial assistance to support any state’s firefighting efforts.

As we wrote then...

What is an FMAG, and how does it support the efforts of first responders and firefighters?

Basically, FMAG’s provide financial assistance so firefighters and first responders can focus all their efforts on reducing the negative impacts of the fire. An FMAG authorization makes FEMA funding available to pay 75 percent of the state's eligible firefighting costs, under an approved grant structure.

Items eligible for FMAGs can include expenses for:
  • field camps;
  • equipment use, repair and replacement;
  • mobilization and demobilization activities; and
  • tools, materials and supplies.

In case you’re interested in the specifics, the program allows for the “mitigation, management, and control” of fires burning on publicly or privately owned forest or grasslands which threaten such destruction as would constitute a major disaster. FMAGs are provided through the President's Disaster Relief Fund and made available by FEMA to assist in fighting fires that threaten to cause a major disaster.

A note on FMAGs: These grants do not provide assistance to individual home or business owners and do not cover other infrastructure damage caused by the fire. A Governor must make a request for a major disaster declaration, including individual assistance, to receive federal disaster assistance for individual home or business owners.

Also, in addition to the support that Tony mentioned yesterday, at the request of the Governor – FEMA, state and local officials began damage assessments in Bastrop County, Texas. These assessments are designed to give the Governor a better picture of disaster damages, and to determine if a request for further federal support is needed. We will continue to work closely with the state and local emergency management officials as their efforts to contain these fires continue.

Visit Ready.gov/wildfires for tips that you can follow to prepare your home and your family.

And follow these state resources online for updated information:

Region VI Supports Texas Firefighting Efforts

Author: 

An historic drought and extremely windy conditions are continuing to take a devastating toll across Texas as wildfires rage in multiple counties.

Just over the long holiday weekend, we authorized Fire Management Assistance Grants for seven fires, meaning FEMA funding will be available to pay 75 percent of state and local government eligible firefighting costs.

We have also deployed Region VI staff from the Individual Assistance Branch, the External Affairs Division, as well as an Incident Management Assistance Team to support our state and local partners as everyone takes stock of the damage done by these fires and maps out a plan for recovery.

We at FEMA are committed to the people of Texas during this difficult time. Our ultimate goal is to help each individual who has been affected by this disaster rebuild their lives and property. We will continue to work with the Governor and his team to provide the necessary support.

This also serves as a stark reminder to us all that disasters can strike anywhere at any time. That’s why we must all collectively be ready; there’s no time like the present as September is National Preparedness Month. We, as emergency managers, should set the example for individuals and communities and do the basics – have a plan, get a kit and stay informed. That will enable us to take better care of the most important people of all – disaster survivors.

September: A Time for Football…and Preparedness

Author: 

Editor’s note: Last week, Administrator Fugate kicked off National Preparedness Month in New York City, in line with many other kick off events held across the country. The post below highlights one event held by our regional office in Philadelphia, Penn. in partnership with the Philadelphia Office of Emergency Management.

For a full list of events happening in your neighborhood for National Preparedness Month, sign up to be a coalition member and view the calendar for your region. To get prepared before an emergency strikes, visit Ready.gov.

Employees from FEMA and the Philadelphia Office of Emergency Management promoted emergency preparedness at the annual football game between Temple University and Villanova University.
Philadelphia, PA, September 1, 2011 -- Employees from FEMA and the Philadelphia Office of Emergency Management promoted emergency preparedness at the annual football game between Temple University and Villanova University.
 

Last week, as our region continued to focus our efforts on supporting states and individuals affected by Hurricane Irene, a few of us from the FEMA Region III office went down to the Mayor's Cup game (annual football game between Temple University and Villanova University) in Philadelphia to help kick off National Preparedness Month. We partnered with the Philadelphia Office of Emergency Management to help spread the word and help people get prepared for emergencies.

We brought with us a spinning wheel (it's on the table on the right in the photo below) with various clues and played "preparedness jeopardy" with fans coming to the game. They would spin the wheel and receive an answer, usually a picture, and they would have to ask a corresponding question. If they asked the right question, we offered them a FEMA pen or a FEMA tape-measure keychain. It was lots of fun to watch people play and learn more about getting prepared!

Philadelphia, PA, September 1, 2011 -- Staff from the FEMA Region III office partnered with the Philadelphia Office of Emergency Management to conduct a "Ready Tailgate" event at the Temple vs Villanova football game to kick of National Preparedness Month 2011.
Philadelphia, PA, September 1, 2011 -- Staff from the FEMA Region III office partnered with the Philadelphia Office of Emergency Management to conduct a "Ready Tailgate" event at the Temple vs Villanova football game to kick of National Preparedness Month 2011.

We also helped educate people on the three steps in the Ready campaign, get a kit, make a plan, be informed. We provided checklists for basic emergency preparedness kits, tips for making an emergency plan, and ways to stay informed. Our partners at Philadelphia Office of Emergency Management helped people get signed up for emergency text messages for Philadelphia, and we spread the word on the FEMA preparedness text messages as well - you can text PREPARE to 43362 (4FEMA) to sign up.

The event was so successful we plan on holding it again at a few different venues throughout the month of September, so hopefully we'll get you to play preparedness jeopardy next time!

New Guidelines for Credentialing Personnel at Emergencies

Author: 

We are pleased to announce the release of the National Incident Management System Guideline for the Credentialing of Personnel. These guidelines offer an outline for processes to provide uniform credentials to authorized personnel who respond to and access specific disaster scenes.
We worked closely with our state, tribal, and local government partners and representatives from the private sector, including volunteer and nonprofit organizations, in developing this guideline to ensure:

  • The credentialing of emergency response providers enables responders to spend less time processing personnel and more time responding to an incident
  • Better coordination among federal, state and local officials and the private sector
  • Effective deployment for response and restoration personnel to disasters, and
  • A more efficient personnel processing system and a quicker response time in times of crisis.

A strong national preparedness system should be based on interoperability, commonality and consistency; this guideline will only further these efforts.

The credentialing guideline (PDF 410KB, TXT 58KB) is posted on the NIMS Resource Center website for all those who are interested and would like to learn more. You can leave your questions on the blog, or send them via Facebook, Twitter, or e-mail.

Irene Update 42: September 5 Recap

President Obama along with Federal, State and Local officials, surveyed flood damages in New Jersey. Tropical Storm Irene created the worst flooding in the area in more than a century.
Paterson, NJ, September 4, 2011 --President Obama along with Federal, State and Local officials, surveyed flood damages in New Jersey. 

The administration, coordinated through FEMA, is committed to bringing all of the resources of the federal family to bear to support the states and territories that have been affected by Hurricane Irene. FEMA, through our regional offices in Boston, MA, Philadelphia, PA, New York City, NY, Atlanta, GA, and our Caribbean Area Office in Puerto Rico, have been in close contact and coordination with the states and territories that have been affected.

President Obama has declared major disaster declarations for the commonwealths and states of North Carolina, New York, New Jersey, Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Pennsylvania and Virginia and the territory of Puerto Rico as well as emergency declarations for North Carolina, Maryland, District of Columbia, Virginia, Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New Hampshire and Vermont, making available federal resources to support recovery efforts.

The following timeline provides an overview of these and other federal activities, to date, to support these territories, states, families and communities.

Monday, September 5

  • DHS Secretary Janet Napolitano is visiting Connecticut to tour damages from Hurricane Irene and meet with state and local officials including Governor Dannel Malloy and first responders.
  • As of noon today, more than 50,600 disaster survivors across North Carolina, New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Vermont and Puerto Rico have registered for assistance.
  • Federal, state, tribal and local personnel continue to work together on preliminary damage assessments in North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, New York and Massachusetts. These assessments are designed to give the governor of each state a better picture of damages, and to determine if a request for further federal support is needed. As these efforts continue, additional areas may be added for assistance.
  • More than 400 community relations specialists are in the field in affected states and additional mobilizations and deployments continue. Community relations teams are helping to inform disaster survivors about available services and resources, and continue to gather situational awareness on the impacts of the storm in support of the affected states.
  • In New York, New Jersey, Vermont, North Carolina and Puerto Rico, Disaster Recovery Centers (DRCs) are open, and more centers are scheduled to open soon. DRCs are locations where disaster survivors can meet one-on-one with representatives from federal, state, local and voluntary agencies to learn about disaster assistance programs. Information about DRC locations and hours is available online at www.fema.gov/drclocator. Check back regularly, as locations are frequently updated, and hours may change.

See yesterday's blog post for a recap of earlier federal activities.

Irene Update 41: September 4 Recap

The administration, coordinated through FEMA, is committed to bringing all of the resources of the federal family to bear to support the states and territories that have been affected by Hurricane Irene. FEMA, through our regional offices in Boston, MA, Philadelphia, PA, New York City, NY, Atlanta, GA, and our Caribbean Area Office in Puerto Rico, have been in close contact and coordination with the states and territories that have been affected.

President Obama has declared major disaster declarations for the commonwealths and states of North Carolina, New York, New Jersey, Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Pennsylvania and Virginia and the territory of Puerto Rico as well as emergency declarations for North Carolina, Maryland, District of Columbia, Virginia, Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New Hampshire and Vermont, making available federal resources to support recovery efforts.

The following timeline provides an overview of these and other federal activities, to date, to support these territories, states, families and communities.

Sunday, September 4

  • President Obama visits Paterson, New Jersey, where he is joined by FEMA Administrator Craig Fugate, to view damage from Hurricane Irene and to be briefed on the response and recovery efforts. FEMA Deputy Administrator Rich Serino travels to Brattleboro, Vermont to meet with state and local officials and visit a Disaster Recovery Center.
  • To date, President Obama has signed major disaster declarations for nine commonwealths and states, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Virginia, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, New Jersey, New York, Vermont, and the territory of Puerto Rico, making additional federal assistance available for recovery efforts.
  • Residents and businesses in disaster-impacted areas of Connecticut, Massachusetts, North Carolina, New York, New Jersey, Vermont and Puerto Rico, who have disaster-related losses not covered by insurance, can apply now for federal disaster assistance online at DisasterAssistance.gov, by web enabled mobile device at m.fema.gov, or by calling 1-800-621-FEMA(3362). Disaster assistance applicants, who have a speech disability or hearing loss and use TTY, should call 1-800-462-7585 directly; for those who use 711 or Video Relay Service (VRS), call 1-800-621-3362.
  • As of noon today, more than 44,000 disaster survivors across North Carolina, New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, Vermont and Puerto Rico have registered for assistance.
  • In New York, New Jersey, Vermont, North Carolina and Puerto Rico, Disaster Recovery Centers (DRCs) are open, and more centers are scheduled to open soon in other hard-hit areas. DRCs are locations where disaster survivors can meet one-on-one with representatives from state, local, federal and voluntary agencies to learn about disaster assistance programs. As residents continue to return to their homes, more centers will be opening. Contact your local emergency management office for more information on locations and hours. As power is restored, DRC locations and hours will also be available online at fema.gov/drclocator. Check back regularly, as locations are frequently updated.
  • More than 600 housing damage inspectors are in the field in North Carolina, New Jersey, New York, Vermont and Puerto Rico to inspect damage to homes of disaster survivors who have applied for disaster assistance. As more survivors continue to apply for assistance, the number of inspectors in the field will continue to grow.
  • More than 6,000 volunteers from voluntary and faith-based organizations, including the American Red Cross, Salvation Army, and the Southern Baptist Convention have been supporting disaster response and recovery efforts along the East Coast.
  • Federal, state and tribal personnel continue to work together on preliminary damage assessments in Pennsylvania, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New York, and North Carolina. These assessments are designed to give the governor of each state a better picture of damages, and to determine if a request for further federal support is needed. As these efforts continue, additional areas may be added for assistance.

See yesterday's blog post for a recap of earlier federal activities.

Update 3: Closely Watching Lee & Katia

Through our regional offices in Atlanta, New York and Texas, we continue to closely monitor tropical storm Lee and Hurricane Katia.

In response to Tropical Storm Lee, an Incident Management and Assistance Team (IMAT) is on site in Louisiana to coordinate with and support state emergency management officials, and a FEMA liaison officer is assigned to the Louisiana Governor’s Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness emergency operation centers (EOC), and additional IMAT teams and liaisons are on standby and will be deployed to other state EOCs, if requested.

Residents in coastal and inland areas around the Gulf of Mexico should continue to closely monitor tropical storm Lee and be prepared for the following weather conditions (as forecasted by the National Weather Service):

  • Total rain accumulations of 10 to 15 inches from the central Gulf Coast northward into the Tennessee Valley are expected, with possible maximum amounts of 20 inches through Monday night,
  • Tropical storm conditions are expected throughout today,
  • Tornadoes are possible today and tonight over portions of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and the far western Florida Panhandle.

As of 10am CDT, from tropical storm Lee, there are tropical storm warnings in effect for Destin, Florida westward to Sabine Pass, Texas, including New Orleans, Lake Pontchartrain, and Lake Maurepas.

As we wrote in yesterday’s update, here are some key terms to know:

  • Flood Watch: flooding is possible. Tune in to NOAA Weather Radio, commercial radio, or television for information
  •  Flash Flood Watch: flash flooding is possible. Be prepared to move to higher ground; listen to NOAA Weather Radio, commercial radio, or television for information.
  •  Flood Warning: flooding is occurring or will occur soon; if advised to evacuate, do so immediately.
  •  Flash Flood Warning: a flash flood is occurring; seek higher ground on foot immediately.
  • Tornado Watch: a tornado is possible in your area.
  • Tornado Warning: a tornado is actually occurring, take shelter immediately.

And here some key safety tips to remember:

  •  Avoid walking or driving through flooded areas – it only takes six inches of fast-moving flood water to knock over an adult and two feet to move a vehicle.
  • Be aware that flash flooding can occur. If there is any possibility of a flash flood, move immediately to higher ground. Do not wait for instructions to move.
  • We urge all individuals in the region to listen to a NOAA Weather Radio and their local news for updates and directions provided by their local officials.
  • Determine in advance where you will take shelter in case of a tornado warning:
    • Storm cellars or basements provide the best protection.
    • If underground shelter is not available, go into an interior room or hallway on the lowest floor possible.
    • In a high-rise building, go to a small interior room or hallway on the lowest floor possible.

And as Always, listen to the instructions of state and local officials.

Regarding Katia, as of 11am AST, the storm had strengthened to become a Category 2 hurricane, but at this time there are no coastal watches or warnings.  For information on the forecast track, visit Hurricane.gov and for the latest severe weather watches/warnings in your area, visit the National Weather Service at weather.gov or mobile.weather.gov on your phone.

Visit Ready.gov for more information on how to prepare for hurricanes, flooding, tornadoes and other hazards, as well as a list of items to add to your emergency kit.

Irene Update 40: September 3 Recap

(Entrada de blog en español / Spanish blog post)

Loiza, PR, September 1, 2011 -- FEMA community relations specialist Enrique Colon, informs disaster survivor about the registration process. Community Relations teams are visiting the affected areas to inform the community about the registration process. Eliud Echevarria/FEMA
Loiza, PR, September 1, 2011 -- FEMA community relations specialist Enrique Colon, informs disaster survivor about the registration process. Community Relations teams are visiting the affected areas to inform the community about the registration process. Eliud Echevarria/FEMA

Albany, NY, September 2, 2011 -- Jamy Arzuaga, Human Resources unit lead, and Annia Santos, HR specialist, are deployed to support FEMA's operation in support of New York State in response to Hurricane Irene. President declares Disaster for State of New York to supplement state and local recovery efforts in the area affected by Hurricane Irene. Photo by Elissa Jun/FEMA.
Albany, NY, September 2, 2011 -- Jamy Arzuaga, Human Resources unit lead, and Annia Santos, HR specialist, are deployed to support FEMA's operation in support of New York State in response to Hurricane Irene. President declares Disaster for State of New York to supplement state and local recovery efforts in the area affected by Hurricane Irene. Photo by Elissa Jun/FEMA.


The administration, coordinated through FEMA, is committed to bringing all of the resources of the federal family to bear to support the states and territories that have been affected by Hurricane Irene. FEMA, through our regional offices in Boston, MA, Philadelphia, PA, New York City, NY, Atlanta, GA, and our Caribbean Area Office in Puerto Rico, have been in close contact and coordination with the states and territories that have been affected.

Over the past week, President Obama has declared major disaster declarations for the states of North Carolina, New York, New Jersey, Vermont and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and emergency declarations for North Carolina, Maryland, District of Columbia, Virginia, Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New Hampshire and Vermont, making available federal resources to support recovery efforts. Prior to Irene's making landfall on the East Coast a week ago today, FEMA deployed teams and resources along the East Coast from South Carolina to Maine.

In advance of Irene moving through the territories in the Caribbean, FEMA deployed teams to both Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands to coordinate directly with local officials on the ground. At the direction of President Obama and DHS Secretary Napolitano, FEMA continues to work with our federal, state, territorial, tribal and local partners, as well as voluntary organizations, the private sector, and others to respond to the aftermath of Irene. The following timeline provides an overview of these and other federal activities, to date, to support these territories, states, families and communities.

Saturday, September 3

  • Residents and businesses in disaster-impacted areas of Connecticut, North Carolina, New York, New Jersey, Vermont and Puerto Rico, who have disaster-related losses not covered by insurance, can apply now for federal disaster assistance online at DisasterAssistance.gov, by web enabled mobile device at m.fema.gov, or by calling 1-800-621-FEMA(3362). Disaster assistance applicants, who have a speech disability or hearing loss and use TTY, should call 1-800-462-7585 directly; for those who use 711 or Video Relay Service (VRS), call 1-800-621-3362.
  • As of noon today, more than 39,401 disaster survivors across North Carolina, New Jersey, New York, Vermont and Puerto Rico have registered for individual assistance, which can include grants for temporary housing, home repairs, and other programs to help individuals and business owners recover from the effects of the Hurricane Irene.
  • Disaster Recovery Centers (DRCs) are currently open in North Carolina, New York and Puerto Rico, and more are being prepared to open in New Jersey and Vermont. DRCs are locations where disaster survivors can meet one-on-one with representatives from state, local, federal, and voluntary agencies to learn about disaster assistance programs. As residents continue to return to their homes, more centers will be opening. Contact your local emergency management office for more information on locations and hours. As power is restored, DRC locations and hours will be available online at www.fema.gov/drclocator. Check back regularly, as locations are frequently updated.
  • The Small Business Administration (SBA) is partnering with FEMA and state, local, tribal and territorial governments to assist in helping conduct damage assessments and provide assistance to disaster survivors and communities. SBA urges businesses and nonprofit organizations that may have incurred losses to learn about low-interest disaster loans of up to $2 million to repair or replace damaged real estate or inventory, as well as Economic Injury Disaster Loans (EIDL). Due to power outages and evacuations, some small businesses made it through the storm, but have lost significant amounts of business. Often, these businesses can be eligible for EIDL loans to help cover working capital needs, regardless of whether the business suffered property damage. More information is available at www.sba.gov.
  • Federal, state and tribal personnel continue to conduct preliminary damage assessments in North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont, Connecticut and Maine. These assessments are designed to give the governor of each state a better picture of damages, and to determine if a request for further federal support is needed.

See yesterday's blog post for a recap of earlier federal activities.

Pages

Back to Top