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Author: Jessica Stapf
Labor Day weekend is a time for a lot of people to head out on fun and relaxing vacations and celebrate the last “official” days of summer. Here, it’s historically a time we find ourselves at our busiest. Labor Day lies right smack dab in the middle of peak hurricane season—and if you’re like us and have been following the forecasts, you might know a little bit about what’s on our radars.Right now, we’re following several different storms forecast to hit two vastly different areas: the Big Island of Hawaii and the Big Bend of Florida. (For those of us...
Posted On: August 31, 2016
Author: Jessica Stapf
It only takes one ticket to win the lottery. It only takes one second to tell a friend you made it home safe. It only takes one storm to change a community forever.We’ve seen it time and time again; instances of just one storm making a mark on a community. We know many of those storms and communities by name.Hurricane season is long. On the Atlantic side, it runs from June 1 through the end of November. Some seasons are more active than others; with multiple storms making landfall in one season. Some seasons don’t have any storms make landfall. Some, well, they only have one. And...
Posted On: June 1, 2016
Author: Craig Fugate
Editor's Note: This post first appeared on the White House Blog. Today we released the 2016 National Preparedness Report, an important guidepost in our work to build a stronger, more resilient America. The findings of this year’s report are significant. This vital information is analyzed to gauge the progress that community partners—including all levels of government, private and nonprofit sectors, faith-based organizations, communities, and individuals—are making to prepare for a wide array of threats and hazards.  We should be prepared for all hazards, from...
Posted On: May 31, 2016
Author: Helen Lowman
Unlike most natural disasters, hurricanes rarely take us by surprise. There’s a season (June 1 – November 30) when forecasters can see hurricanes developing off the coast, hundreds of miles away, and  can track them as they move closer to land. However, when they hit, high winds, heavy rainfall, storm surges, coastal and inland flooding, rip currents, and even tornadoes are all part of the hurricane package that can really pack a punch. That’s why if you live in an area where hurricanes are a threat, now is the time to prepare. Watch this short animation about hurricane...
Posted On: May 19, 2016
Author: Craig Fugate
Editor's Note: This post originally appeared on the National Hurricane Center's "Inside the Eye" blog. Hurricane season is almost here. The season officially starts June 1 and ends November 30. During these seven months, forecasters watch hurricanes as they develop hundreds of miles off the coast. While we may see a hurricane coming, we won’t know the impact it will have on a community until well after landfall. To ensure the safety of you and your family, don’t wait until it's too late to prepare; know your zone today.   It only takes one...
Posted On: May 16, 2016
Author: Jessica Stapf
The way I see it, the world is kind of like driving in Mario Kart. Some disasters we can see coming with the help of weather forecasts—like hurricanes. They are like Mario Kart bananas—they’re bad, but we have time to prepare for them. Other disasters, like earthquakes, we can’t predict. They are more like blue shells, which are designed to take out whoever is leading the race when they’re least expecting it.This year's hurricane season smashed records in both oceans; the Atlantic for being below-average, the Pacific for being above-average.1In the Pacific...
Posted On: December 18, 2015
Author: David Mace
When Nicolas Cage jumped off the deck of the aircraft carrier USS Intrepid in the movie “National Treasure,” no one could have imagined this towering World War II warship would have to fight one more battle — against the forces of Hurricane Sandy.However, this National Historic Landmark had an ally on board. FEMA threw the Intrepid a lifeline in the form of $13 million in funding for cleaning, rebuilding and strengthening the vessel against future disasters.The ship, moored in New York’s Hudson River, is now home to the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum. During...
Posted On: December 3, 2015
Author: Jessica Stapf
Erica, Rita, Tina, and Sandra aren’t just four of the names in “Mambo No. 5.” In fact, they’re also four female names that either have been or will be used to name hurricanes or tropical cyclones. After seeing some of the uniquely-named storms this season, I decided to do a little research. Here are the six most interesting tidbits I found:Hurricanes used to be named based on their latitude and longitude. The process switched over to using names in order to make the process easier and more accurate.After much debate and some trial and error, the United States started...
Posted On: October 26, 2015
Author: Rafael Lemaitre
All it takes is one.One hurricane. One tornado. One flood, earthquake, or fire to displace a family, upend a business, destroy a school - or worse.  No one is immune to the threat of disasters, and 2014 was no exception. View in FEMA Multimedia LibraryIn March, we witnessed an entire community wiped away from the mudslide that hit Oso, Washington. In August, an earthquake hit Napa damaging buildings and homes.  And in September, severe weather in Michigan generated significant flooding, affecting thousands of families in Detroit, just to name a few.  But how does 2014...
Posted On: March 12, 2015
Author: Craig Fugate, John Podesta
(Editor's note: This post originally appeared on the White House blog.)When Hurricane Sandy hit New York City, the storm sent water cascading into the South Ferry subway station, pouring into the Brooklyn-Battery Tunnel, inundating neighborhoods from Staten Island to Queens. At Battery Park in lower Manhattan, water reached more than 9 feet above the average high-tide line.One factor fueling the surge -- New York Harbor, where waters have risen about a foot since 1900. We know that rising sea levels, higher average temperatures, higher ocean temperatures, and other effects of climate...
Posted On: January 30, 2015