What We’re Watching: 7/19/13

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At the end of each week, we post a "What We’re Watching" blog as we look ahead to the weekend and recap events from the week. We encourage you to share it with your friends and family, and have a safe weekend.

Weather Outlook

For many parts of the U.S. it’s been a scorcher all week long, but it looks as though things are finally going to cool off as slightly lower temperatures are expected next week. In the meantime, here are some extreme heat safety tips to keep in mind until the cool down arrives:

  • Cover windows that receive morning or afternoon sun with drapes, shades, awnings, or louvers. (Outdoor awnings or louvers can reduce the heat that enters a home by up to 80 percent.)
  • Know those in your neighborhood who are elderly, young, sick or overweight. They are more likely to become victims of excessive heat and may need help
  • Never leave children or pets alone in closed vehicles.
  • Stay indoors as much as possible and limit exposure to the sun.
  • Consider spending the warmest part of the day in public buildings such as libraries, schools, movie theaters, shopping malls, and other community facilities. Circulating air can cool the body by increasing the perspiration rate of evaporation.
  • Eat well-balanced, light, and regular meals. Avoid using salt tablets unless directed to do so by a physician.
  • Drink plenty of water; even if you do not feel thirsty. Avoid drinks with caffeine and limit intake of alcoholic beverages.
  • Dress in loose-fitting, lightweight, and light-colored clothes that cover as much skin as possible. Avoid dark colors because they absorb the sun’s rays. Protect your face and head by wearing a wide-brimmed hat.
  • Avoid strenuous work during the warmest part of the day. Use a buddy system when working in extreme heat, and take frequent breaks.

For more extreme heat safety tips and information, visit www.Ready.gov/heat.

Our friends at the National Weather Service don’t expect any other severe weather over the next couple of days, but as we know weather conditions can rapidly change.  We encourage everyone to monitor your local weather conditions at www.weather.gov or on your mobile phone at http://mobile.weather.gov.

Photos of Week

Here are a few of my favorite photos from the week. You can find more photos at the FEMA Photo Library.


San Francisco, Calif., July 18, 2013 -- Attendees and participants of the 11th FEMA Think Tank listen and contribute to the discussion facilitated by Deputy Administrator Rich Serino at the San Francisco Tech Shop.San Francisco, Calif., July 18, 2013 -- Attendees and participants of the 11th FEMA Think Tank listen and contribute to the discussion facilitated by Deputy Administrator Rich Serino at the San Francisco Tech Shop.

Alakanuk, Alaska, July 16, 2013 -- The Alaska State Coordinating Officer Sam Walton and Federal Coordinating Officer Dolph A. Diemont meet with City Manager James Blowe to discuss the FEMA programs.Alakanuk, Alaska, July 16, 2013 -- The Alaska State Coordinating Officer Sam Walton and Federal Coordinating Officer Dolph A. Diemont meet with City Manager James Blowe to discuss the FEMA programs which will assist in the recovery efforts after severe flooding crippled the entire infrastructure. Federal funding in the form of Public Assistance (PA) is available to state, tribal and eligible local governments and certain nonprofit organizations on a cost sharing basis for emergency work and the repair or replacement of facilities damaged by the flooding in the Alaska Gateway Regional Educational Attendance Area (REAA), Copper River REAA, Lower Yukon REAA, Yukon Flats REAA, and the Yukon-Koyukuk REAA.

Last Updated: 
07/19/2013 - 16:21
Posted on Fri, 07/19/2013 - 16:21
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