What We’re Watching: 4/26/13

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At the end of each week, we post a "What We’re Watching" blog as we look ahead to the weekend and recap events from the week. We encourage you to share it with your friends and family, and have a safe weekend.

Monitoring Flooding in Midwest

We continue to closely monitor the impacts of severe weather and current and possible flooding conditions in several Central U.S. and Midwest states. We encourage all residents in potentially affected areas to follow the direction of local officials and keep informed of local conditions by monitoring local radio or TV stations for updated weather and emergency information.  And remember, if local authorities order an evacuation, leave immediately; follow evacuation routes announced by officials, and stay away from coastal areas, river banks and streams.

Driving through a flooded area can be extremely dangerous. When you are in your car, look out for flooding in low lying areas, at bridges, and at highway dips. As little as six inches of water may cause you to lose control of your vehicle.  Remember – turn around, don’t drown.

Those in areas affected by the heavy rains and/or in areas anticipating high river crests, familiarize yourself with the terms that are used to identify a flood hazard and discuss with your family what to do if a flood watch or warning is issued.  Here are some terms to familiarize yourself with:

  • Flood Watch: Flooding is possible. Tune in to NOAA Weather Radio, commercial radio, or television for information 
  • Flash Flood Watch: Flash flooding is possible. Be prepared to move to higher ground; listen to NOAA Weather Radio, commercial radio, or television for information. 
  • Flood Warning: Flooding is occurring or will occur soon; if advised to evacuate, do so immediately. 
  • Flash Flood Warning: A flash flood is occurring; seek higher ground on foot immediately. 

You can visit www.Ready.gov/floods for more information and safety tips on what to do before, during and after a flood.

In the News

FEMA Deputy Administrator Rich Serino was on the ground in his hometown of Boston, Massachusetts, last week during the bombing attacks at the Boston Marathon. Today, he shared his perspective on the community-wide effort to respond to last week's tragic bombings in an op-ed for the Boston Globe.

Here’s a little of what he had to say:

Growing up in Boston, you know that Patriot’s Day and the Boston Marathon come together to create a day like no other. We pause to celebrate our heritage, the city shines and our streets fill with millions of residents and visitors from around the block and around the world. For most of my life, I worked those same streets for Boston EMS, ending a 36-year career as chief of the department in 2009.

There were many nights I went home proud of the men and women of Boston EMS, but I was never more proud of them and the residents of my town, than I was last week.

While in one moment we saw terror and brutality, in the next we saw our community’s love and compassion. We saw our EMTs, paramedics, police officers, and firefighters spring into action and perform their jobs heroically.

Read the rest of Deputy Administrator’s Serino’s perspective.

In Case You Missed It

Inspiration was also on hand this week.  The White House held its Champions of Change ceremony honoring people and organizations directly involved in response and recovery efforts following Hurricane Sandy. These hidden heroes implemented innovative, collaborative solutions to meet the unique needs of communities and neighborhoods as they worked to rebuild after the devastating effects of this disaster.

Washington, D.C., April 24, 2013 -- White House Champions of Change event which honored people and organizations directly involved in response and recovery efforts following Hurricane Sandy. These hidden heroes implemented innovative, collaborative solutions to meet the unique needs of communities and neighborhoods as they worked to rebuild after the devastating effects of this disaster.

CAPTION: Washington, D.C., April 24, 2013 -- This White House Champions of Change event honored people and organizations involved in response and recovery efforts following Hurricane Sandy.
 

 Washington, D.C., April 24, 2013 -- This White House Champions of Change event honored people and organizations directly involved in response and recovery efforts following Hurricane Sandy. These hidden heroes implemented innovative, collaborative solutions to meet the unique needs of communities and neighborhoods as they worked to rebuild after the devastating effects of this disaster.

CAPTION: Washington, D.C., April 24, 2013 -- White House Champions of Change stand for a picture with FEMA Administrator Craig Fugate.
 

We also live-tweeted the event and I wanted to share two tweets that stuck out to me:

Congratulations to these men and women for their dedication and commitment to serve their fellow neighbors during their time of need.

Have a safe weekend!

Last Updated: 
04/26/2013 - 15:22
Posted on Fri, 04/26/2013 - 15:13
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