What We’re Watching: 4/20/12

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At the end of each week, we post a "What We’re Watching" blog as we look ahead to the weekend and recap events from the week. We encourage you to share it with your friends and family, and have a safe weekend.
 
Weather Outlook

This weekend, there are no significant severe weather threats. The folks at NOAA forecast below normal temperatures for most of the Western U.S. Heavy rainfall is expected across the Mid-Atlantic region and New England. Heavy rainfall over a short period of time can cause flash flooding. If heavy rainfall is expected in your area, be familiar with these terms:

  • Flood Watch: Flooding is possible. Tune in to NOAA Weather Radio, commercial radio, or television for information 
  • Flash Flood Watch: Flash flooding is possible. Be prepared to move to higher ground; listen to NOAA Weather Radio, commercial radio, or television for information. 
  • Flood Warning: Flooding is occurring or will occur soon; if advised to evacuate, do so immediately.
  • Flash Flood Warning: A flash flood is occurring; seek higher ground on foot immediately. 

Visit www.ready.gov/floods for tips on what to do before, during, and after flooding. Be sure to discuss with your family what to do if a flood watch or warning is issued.

Severe drought conditions are expected to continue throughout the Southeast, Central and Southern Plains, Upper Mississippi Valley, the Southwest, and portions of the California. Severe drought conditions are also expected for parts of the Mid-Atlantic and New England.

We encourage everyone to monitor your area's local forecast, as weather conditions can often change. Stay up-to-date on the forecast in your area by visiting weather.gov or mobile.weather.gov on your mobile device.

National Volunteer Week Wrap-Up
This week, we’ve been celebrating and thanking the millions of people who donate their time and services and volunteer across the country each year. Here at FEMA, we work closely with many faith-based and community organizations to help individuals affected by disasters. These volunteers play a key role during disaster response and recovery, and volunteers are important members of the emergency management team.

Here are our blogs on National Volunteer Week:

We salute and thank all of those who volunteer their time and services and help the nation each and every day.

Severe Weather Preparedness Week Kickoff
Next week (April 22 - April 28), we’re partnering with NOAA for the first National Severe Weather Preparedness Week. All week, we’ll be providing the public with information about the threat of severe weather and the importance of being prepared for severe weather before it strikes. We’re asking people to pledge to prepare and be a force of nature by telling their family, friends and communities how they prepared for severe weather. Knowing your risks and knowing what steps to take can save your life. Join us all week as we share important information and tips on how you can prepare for severe weather.

Visit www.ready.gov/severeweather for more information and tools you can use to be a force of nature.

White House Twitter Chat 
As part of Severe Weather Preparedness Week, Administrator Fugate and Dr. Kathryn Sullivan, the National Weather Service Deputy Administrator, will be participating in a White House Twitter Chat. On Tuesday, April 24 at 11 a.m. EST, they’ll discuss the dangers of severe weather and the importance of getting prepared before severe weather strikes. You can ask questions and follow the chat on Twitter by using the hashtag #WHChat and following @WHLive.

Last Updated: 
07/10/2012 - 14:59
Posted on Fri, 04/20/2012 - 18:55
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